in the avant-garden of love

Date/Time

February 13, 2020 - February 14, 2020
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

 
Location

Jan Serr Studio

 

Eric Segnitz presents an edgy, love-inspired chamber concert, featuring works by Swedish singer/composer/visual artist Sophie Duner, and post-modern love songs by Americans Corey Dargel, Carla Kihlstedt, Louis (Moondog) Hardin and John Zorn.

The avant-garden of love includes a premiere showing of the American 1927 avant-garde silent film, The Love of Zero, with original live score composed by Eric Segnitz.

Let your creative side go wild with a special couple’s upgrade option before the Valentine’s Day concert on February 14th, led by surprise local visual artists! 

 

 


 


 

Guest Artist Spotlight:

Headshot of Sophie Duner

Photograph by: Petra Björstad

Sophie Dunèr

Sophie Dunér is a singer, songwriter, composer and visual artist. Originally from Sweden, she travels and performs internationally as her blend of jazz, world music and contemporary classical writing receives demand worldwide – from the infamous CBGB´s in New York City to Buenos Aires Festival de Música Contemporánea de La Plata to Festival O/Modernt in Sweden.

The music of Sophie may be described as a blend of the romantic and the spiritually elevated with a dissonant, bold and satirical edge. It plays with tense colours resolving into romantic harmony or vice versa. This applies to the music as well as the lyrics, which are mostly tragicomic. With her musical roots in jazz, Sophie has developed in a direction mainly created by herself or, as producer Michael Haas has it: “It’s not fusion – it’s Dúneresque – a newly created genre!” However, you may find a rich blend of influences from jazz, contemporary classical and world music. The bold lyrics are an essential element of the music, creating colours and rhythms that relate to the narrative, spiced with satire that is reminiscent of the 30s, but set in a contemporary arrangement. Sophie personally draws heavily on a variety of composers such as Weill, Monk, Mingus and Stravinsky. She perceives her music visually, and her songs are strongly connected to her paintings.

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